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Archive for the ‘half marathon’ Category

A week ago I completed my Cardiolite Exercise Test at the cardiology lab. My heart rate was a little elevated so I reached the 85% of max a little sooner than I usually do. No worries… it stands to reason after having two interventions in as many months, not to mention running on a 14% incline is nothing to sneeze at.

On the weekend things took an interesting turn. On Halloween I was taken to the ER at Hamilton General with similar symptoms as before when I had a 90% blockage. Let me say that the ER is a very strange and unusual place on Halloween especially when there is a full moon and a time change causing the nurses to have to work 13-hour shifts amidst the craziness. On Sunday I was transferred to the cardiac ward and scheduled for an angiogram to see what was causing symptoms that the doctors believed to be unstable angina. At first I shrugged off the discomfort and figured it was from running so soon after coronary intervention.

This brings us to Monday evening post-angio. There was nothing wrong from a cardiac perspective and anxiety had also been ruled out as well. The two places where I have stents are “widely patent” which in layman’s terms means that they are clear and blood flow is really good. The one bit of scarring that has caused a blockage they can’t do anything about is “well collateralized” which means I have new arteries handling the blood flow. That’s a good thing. So what was causing this pain? It turns out, or so we suspect, that I was experiencing a well-known side-effect to a blood thinning medication called Brilinta (ticagrelor) although there was some differences of opinion between my doctors. I started on this medication three weeks prior by the same doctor who I ended up reporting because he didn’t take my heart condition seriously. This certainly didn’t help my confidence levels that the medicine was the right one for me. On Tuesday morning I discontinued the Brilinta against the wishes of the doctor on the cardiac floor at Hamilton General. Instead I took a loading dose of the blood thinner that I was on up until early October. With that, the pain has completely vanished and I feel better than I have in months.

Once again there were issues with having to be aware of my condition and voice concerns to a doctor from the cardiac ward. He was going to prescribe a medication to help with the symptoms rather than remove the medication that was triggering the issue. The thing is what he wanted me to take lowers heart rate considerably. As a runner, my resting HR already sits around 50 bpm and if it were to be lowered further that could be actually a bit dangerous. When I spoke up the doctor realized his mistake and agreed. This puts me back at the realization that so many people would have just done what the doctor said without question. Being educated about my disease and advocating for myself has proven to be such a vital thing.

I came home after that, on Tuesday, and called my cardiologist, Dr. J.’s office. His assistant spoke to him about my refusal to take the Brilinta, my return to the other blood thinner, as well as the results of my Cardiolite Exercise Test. Yesterday morning when I was having tea with a dear friend I got that call that he felt going off the Brilinta was a wise choice. She also relayed that I had done very well on the treadmill, my heart is stable and I can resume running, cycling and most things at the gym in a few weeks. The only reason I can’t return immediately is that they did the angio on Monday via my femoral artery and I need a bit of time to heal. I can also resume weight training in late November or early December.

I have a few tidbits of running news.

I’ve signed up for the 5K distance at the Mercedes 10K race in Oakville on April 24, 2016. My husband Bryan will be running the 10K and it we will so some of our weekday runs together.

The other bit of running news is wonderful and it involves another Spring race… but I can’t share the details just yet. As soon as I am able to make things public I’ll post my news. What I can say is that a tremendous and exciting opportunity to make a difference has sprung out of the heart health hurdles I’ve had to jump these past months. I’m going to take this wee bit of down time to make a realistic training plan with the mind and there may be some shoe shopping… oh and my running playlist could use an update.

It’s all part of moving forward with strength, courage, and strong spirit… i mua.

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Here we are again with yet another of my post-hospital updates and I am hoping that this is the last one for a very long time. This was quite the adventure so you might want to get comfy for the long read. I’m going to start off by thanking my family and friends who were such a big support last week while I was in hospital and Bryan was stuck in Germany. I am grateful to have such wonderful people in my life.

You are likely wondering what happened seeing as I had an extremely mild heart attack in August and everything seemed to be going quite well. Things went a little haywire and I’m posting my story to illustrate how imperative it is that we advocate for our health—to realize that not all physicians know our bodies as well as we do.

I was back to running and feeling better than I had in a very long time. I had the all-clear to train for events again but I needed to build my base first. A Spring half-marathon was on my mind and my Cardiologist, Dr. J. was on-board with that as well. I went for a run on the trails with my teenaged son on the Sunday and then to the gym on Thursday. There was lots of walking on the days inbetween. It was almost 35K in a week which was more than I had done in some time but I was very cautious about not overdoing things. Friday evening I was tired but I figured that was because I was getting up really early every day and reading late into the night. Saturday I started to have warmth on the back of my neck, shoulder and arm. I went out to the camp gathering we were hosting and came home early. By Sunday it had worsened. My husband Bryan was heading to Germany for an important work project so I sugar-coated how I felt and he flew out Sunday on schedule. By Monday morning the pain was so horrible that I made the decision to go to the Emergency Room at Brantford General Hospital (BGH). I was sent home as the doctor felt it was muscle strain. Tuesday morning I walked my daughter to school and I also walked her home at the end of the day. The pain was worsening. About an hour after she went to bed it was as bad as it was before I went to the hospital back in August. I tried the Nitroglycerin spray that I had been prescribed and, after the third dose didn’t provide any relief,  my son helped me get ready for the hospital. I was on the verge of collapse so an ambulance was called.

Once in the ambulance the paramedics were having a tough time deciding if I should go to Hamilton or Brantford. My ECG wasn’t bad enough for them to take me straight to Hamilton General so BGH it was. I was taken immediately into the ER and my Troponin levels were tested repeatedly… they came back negative for heart attack. During the last round of blood work the technician couldn’t even get a teaspoon of blood from my right arm which was strange. The fact that I wasn’t having a heart attack was a relief however there was still gripping pain like someone was squeezing my heart. Sometime in the wee hours Wednesday morning I had relief from the pain because of a multitude of nitroglycerin doses and pain medications. I finally saw an Internist who told me he had a strong background in cardiology. We’ll call him Dr. A for now. We talked about my horrendous family history of heart disease, what I had been through, and then he said “I’m not accepting patients right now but I’d like to take your case on in my private practice.” Then he went on to say that he felt this was unstable angina and that he thought my cardiologist gave me false hope about the collateral artery business. Dr. A. acted as if Dr. J. was clueless. He wanted to send me home with an increased dosage of blood pressure medication, a nitroglycerin patch, and a pain medicine that I believe he said is normally used for gout so I wouldn’t feel the symptoms. I don’t have gout so I wasn’t sure how that would help but maybe I was missing something. I asked if I would be able to exercise. He bluntly said “no”. I asked if I would be able to walk Kaia to school. He said “no” again. So there it was… his solution was to cover the pain and have me become completely sedentary—a couch potato.

Not acceptable!!

My intuition told me I was heading for another heart attack. I knew I had a blockage… after all I’ve been in this position before and remember all too well what it felt like. I told him that I have a cardiologist that I quite like and that I live an active lifestyle that I am not about to give up on that easily. I insisted that he send me to Hamilton General for an angioplasty. Dr. A. told me that this idea was “ridiculous” as I had just had one in August. He said I “would be wasting everyone’s time” and that I just “need to learn to live with this unstable angina”. He told me I had done this to myself and I had to take my lumps. I let him know that if he discharged me I would go above his head at BGH or straight to Hamilton General’s emergency department. I mentioned that I know my body and that this felt just like it did the last two times. I asserted myself and he reluctantly relented. Dr. A. learned just what a strong advocate I am for my health. I told him that it seemed to me his policy was to wait until the patient has a heart attack rather than try and prevent it while my cardiologist’s approach is prevention. I reiterated that I was not about to go home and sit on my ass and wait for something more serious to happen.

Unbelievable!

Finally, after I protested quite strongly, Dr. A. gave in and said he’d call Hamilton General to see what they thought but that they would not likely take me in for an angiogram. He felt that they would deem it as useless as he did. He was being very pompous and clearly didn’t like that I dared question his judgement. He seemed very frustrated with my denial that his first choice of treatment was the right course of action. I didn’t care because this was my life hanging in the balance.

Come Thursday morning Bryan was still trying to get a flight home but I insisted that he stay and finish his work. Everything here was under control. I was booked to go to Hamilton for 10 am with the procedure to be done at 1 pm. Dr. A. came into see me before the transport and said “You can still stop this and save everyone a lot of resources. They will not find anything!” I retorted “You’ll find out today just how much I know my body.” I was upset that he would even say this to a cardiac patient before an invasive procedure. He was quite snotty about the whole thing and seemed aggravated that I even questioned his diagnosis and treatment plan.

I was transported to Hamilton shortly after the doctor left. The nurses remembered me from last time and were shocked to see me back. One of the nurses left my file where I could reach it so I decided to read through the report from the doctors in Brantford. Dr. A. and the doctor from Monday’s ER visit had put in my file that I suffer from acid reflux among other falsehoods. I think the only time I’ve had anything remotely similar to that is when I was in my last weeks of pregnancy and when I had the heart problems in August… that was my heart not reflux. It was also stated that I saw Dr. J. in September because of continued chest pain. More BS. I saw him because I underwent testing to see if I could get back to running and the gym. The notes painted an incorrect picture which I assume was because the staff didn’t pay attention to the history I was giving them or perhaps it was to cover someone’s ass. Who knows? Still, it was incorrect. The nurse reprimanded me for reading my file when I drew this to her attention. Oops. Apparently I am not allowed to see my medical file without permission even though it is about my health. Go figure.

The angiogram started right on schedule which is quite unusual—it’s a busy place. This time I had Dr. T. who is the same surgeon I had for the first angioplasty in March 2014 when I also had a similar battle about getting checked out. He is a fabulous surgeon and back then had found a blockage that many doctors would have overlooked as it appeared to be a shadow on the imaging more so than a blockage. This was due to it being near an abnormal bend in the artery. I was conscious, as always, during the procedure which is rather freaky. I couldn’t feel my body but my I was lucid and aware of what was going on. He accessed the heart through my right wrist and found a blockage, with the similar shadowing issues at a bend—this time in the other side of my heart. He looked at my right coronary (RCA), for what seemed like an awfully long time. He called in another surgeon to look as well. The contrast dye was increased and sure enough my RCA had a 90% blockage. He used a balloon and a stent to repair the issue. The investigation and procedure took just under two hours. It went flawlessly and I was sent to recovery. I had a slight hematoma starting in my wrist as the clamp was loosened but the nurse was right on top of things unlike last time with my leg.

Later Dr. T. came to see me and I asked if this was a new blockage. He said that was somewhat unlikely for a blockage of that size to pop up in less than two months but it can happen. He also told me that I have a myocardial bridge. That’s something I would have been likely born with but, despite two previous PCIs no one has ever mentioned it. Dr. T. said it was brilliant that I knew my body so well and advocated for the angiogram because had I not this would have resulted in a heart attack causing a great deal of tissue death or, even worse, my demise.

Gulp!

I was transported back to BGH at 7 pm. I got settled back into my room and Nurse Judy came to see me. I told her what had happened and that I wanted to see Dr. A. in the morning to talk with him. She said that she already saw the report and of course he would see me… after all he would be the one releasing me so it wouldn’t be an issue.

Fast forward to last Friday morning. Nurse Judy came with my release papers and they had already been signed by a doctor without anyone coming to see me. I signed everything and reiterated that I would like to speak with to Dr. A. I could hear his voice down the hallway. Two hours passed and Dr. H. came to see me instead. She got quite the earful albeit very politely as it wasn’t her fault that Dr. A. put her in this awkward position. Dr. H. also saw me back in August and knew a bit about my situation. I explained to her that I was upset with what had transpired and that I planned to pursue the matter of his unprofessional behaviour with the proper governing authorities.

What angers and scares me about this is that some most patients would have just accepted what he said to be the right course of action because he is, after all, the Doctor. I can’t fathom that Dr. A. was going to put me at risk for a potentially fatal heart attack so he could drum up business for his practice and how much he was belittling me in the process. I’m upset that he didn’t take my symptoms seriously and treated me like I was wasting resources. I’m appalled that he didn’t have the integrity to come and face me when it turned out he was very wrong. He could have at least apologized but I suspect this is a case of ego. What an… insert whatever expletive comes to your mind.

The bottom line and the reason I share this is to remind all of us that we need to advocate for ourselves because sometimes doctors are driven by agendas other than doing the best for their patients. We have to educate ourselves and be assertive about our care because, in many cases, the reality is that we are just another number. I was “bed 1 in room 558 on the 5th floor”.

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Acceptance doesn’t mean resignation; it means understanding that something is what it is and that there’s got to be a way through it. – Michael J. Fox

Thursday morning…

After a two week bout of bronchitis, which I am still not 100% rid of, I sit at my desk while writing a note to Canada Running Series. As the tears roll down my cheeks I request that my registration be transferred from a full marathon to a half marathon. These aren’t tears of sadness, but of relief. I’ve been struggling with this decision for quite some time. I put a lot of pressure on myself not to let anyone down. I was going to run this marathon even if it took me seven hours. I made promises to Canada Running Series and myself.

So, if I wanted to run a marathon so badly, why the change?

The crux of the matter is that I have lost a lot of my running base because of being off with broken toes and the problems with my heart. Two weeks after the heart procedure my cardiologist said to hang on to the dream of running the full at Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon this October and a few weeks after that, I was running again. I got carried away with the excitement of making it through such an ordeal that I accepted the opportunity to run the full as one of the Digital Champions for STWM.  I was alive and felt great. My speed workouts were more effective. I felt energized and ready to tackle the marathon.

feet in training

moving forward

When I brought those Saturday morning long runs back in the mix it was a struggle. I could no longer run the distances I had become accustomed to the year before. The high heat and humidity were definitely factors that made the runs exceedingly more difficult. I convinced myself that maybe it was a mental block because I couldn’t seem to get past where I was before I had the heart problems. But if I am being honest with myself, that’s not all it was—what I had to accept is that my base has suffered. I was off for a few months with the toes and then a few more with the heart blockage, so it is my reality. Not to mention, my body has been through some trauma and I’m dealing with the side effects of being on a blood thinner (things like anemia and bruising).

Bronchitis meant more time away from building that base but it also gave me pause to really think about what I want to do… what I need to do. Time has become a factor. There are a mere 13 weeks until race day. This means I would only get one 32K training run in. For most first-timers that wouldn’t be a problem however being diabetic throws a wrench into things for me. I would like to have a few more of those long runs in a training plan so that I can learn how my body reacts to fueling. Not having a good handle on that can result in not being able to finish. The bottom line is that I could run the 42.2K but training without the solid base would open me up to injury or disappointment.

It just isn’t training time. It is also time with family. I’m a Mom first. My partner, Bryan, will be away on business for much of August and September. In August, he’ll be home on weekends but in September he’ll be at a huge tradeshow in another country. We won’t have a lot of time to spend together and training for the full will reduce that even further. This happens every other year and, in hindsight, I should have considered it when deciding to run a full.

Don’t mistake these reasons for excuses because they are not. I’m still going to be running and training. The only change will be the length of time I am putting in on those weekend long distance runs. This is acceptance of where I am at with body, mind, and spirit. It is the realization that this has been a really rough year and that I need to be gentle with my spirit while moving forward. I am at peace with the path I have chosen.

The goal remains the same—the timeline has merely shifted. I still consider myself as being in training for a marathon… I’m just taking a more scenic route to get there. I plan to become a stronger runner, build my core strength and flexibility, and listen to my body. I will run a few half marathons and perhaps Around the Bay 30K, then revisit the idea of a full marathon sometime in 2015.

When I shared the news of my transfer with my friend Kim, a marathon runner, her words summed it up perfectly…

Everybody seems to want to rush through the entire running bucket list. The marathon isn’t going anywhere—it will still be there when you’re ready.

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As I embark on some serious training for the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, I realize that many of the people who read this blog or follow me on twitter may not realize why I chose such a name.

So often in my life I have felt or been made to feel that things are impossible and had people encourage me to give up. In 2012 I first mentioned my want to run a half marathon and was greeted with “why would you bother?” and “you are just setting yourself up for failure” from someone I was close to. After my heart issue that same person said “we were just waiting for you to have to give up this silly running business” and ” I hope you realize now that you can’t do this”. It is a lack of support that I had grown accustomed to but the difference is that I am a runner now. Running has made me realize that the only limits I have are the ones I place upon myself.

Why the name Finding My Inner Possible?

This is a phrase that reflects my getting in touch with that part inside of me that makes what I strive for… well… possible. My Mom always called this “intestinal fortitude”. From the outside my dreams, goals, and aspirations may seem, to some people, way beyond my limits but I have the belief and inner strength that I can do anything as long as I put my mind to it.  Inner possible is about how having a positive mindset and drawing on inner strength can help me to believe in myself when others don’t and to realize my full potential.

We all have an inner possible. I encourage you to find yours and embrace it. If you are training for your first race, whether it is a 5K or 100 miler, please feel free to train virtually alongside of me via twitter and use #innerpossible so we can encourage each other. I’d love to see how you use your inner possible to do things you once thought you never could.

If you want to connect on twitter just follow me @innerpossible.

Life is short… go out and embrace it!

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The other day I was chatting with a friend and we were discussing what our goals are. We chatted about the races we’ve chosen for 2014 and what motivates us. She and I have been on somewhat parallel journeys so it was great to talk with someone who gets the struggles I deal with.  And… we talked about the setbacks we have both experienced lately. Our conversation made me sit back and take pause. That’s not always a bad thing and I feel that it is good to re-evaluate my goals from time to time so I don’t lose sight of the bigger picture—a healthy life.

Setbacks happen and it is very important that I don’t beat myself up about a few steps backwards. It happens to all of us at one time or another. On November 9th, 2013, as many of you know, I broke two of the toes on my left foot when I accidentally kicked a dumbbell that was sitting against the big oak desk in my office. This meant that running, and pretty much any other exercise that involved my toes, came to a screeching halt. This time off from running hit me like a ton of bricks and I took it really hard. It wasn’t just that I couldn’t exercise or that I was concerned about diabetes. You see, I use running as my way of thinking things through and dealing with the negatives in my life. 2013 started with the death of my Mom and the time off finally forced me to work through some of the grief. I gained a little weight and started to self-deprecate. I had worked so hard. I was within 15 lbs of my goal and then I lost momentum. How could I let this happen? I could make all sorts of excuses but the bottom line is that I just gave up caring about myself because I was wallowing. The good thing is that it was a short-lived hiccup and I am back on track.

My motivation for running hasn’t changed very much. It’s still about having fun while working on fitness and enjoying activities that we can do as a family. Running is my insulin and my way to keep ill effects of living with diabetes at bay. It’s also a social outlet for me which caught me somewhat by surprise. I have met so many wonderful runners who encourage and inspire. This is something I try to pay forward. Being a Digital Champion for the Toronto Yonge Street 10K is just one way I am doing that. Giving back in other ways is important to me as well and I love fundraising for a good cause.

I also thought about the commitment and drive to improve. I like to dream big and sometimes I will chose a distance and think that I’ve bitten off more than I can chew. That was certainly how it felt when I started training for my first half. During that time I discovered something… training isn’t a chore to me but rather something I embrace. I enjoy the process immensely—I love a long run on a Saturday morning and the way it makes me feel. It also makes me happy to see how I progress week after week and month after month. Being off with the broken toes reinforced how much I missed being in training for a long distance event. Every long run last winter and spring was a new milestone and on those runs I was able to gain clarity or perspective about things other than running. Accomplishing those goals gave me courage to make some wonderful changes in my life. My feelings about being a distance runner remain the same… I enjoy the process and it helps me grow as a runner and as a person. It’s a win win for me.

This year I plan to tackle the full marathon. It scares me because being diabetic adds some other challenges especially when it comes to things like fuelling, hypoglycaemia, and foot injuries. This adventure brings a good kind of fear too. It’s the kind of apprehension that gives me the butterflies but makes me feel really alive. This distance will be a huge challenge for me and the fact I am even going to try is very exciting. Training will be tough and time consuming but there is something about it that simply calls to me. I have an amazing circle of support and hold onto the belief that I can realize my dream of crossing the finish line after running 42.2K. I may not be speedy but I have spirit and I will cross a finish line in the footsteps of so many people that have inspired me to try.

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This is my guest post as it appeared today on the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon (Canada Running Series) blog.

TORONTO. January 11th 2014. Digital Champion Laurie Ann March works hard to balance her hectic life with her love of running. She will tell you that she treats being active as a priority and with good reason. Laurie changed her lifestyle drastically in order to successfully lose 180 lbs. Laurie’s family has joined her on her running journey and she believes that being active is a great way to spend quality time together. Connect with Laurie on Twitter @innerpossible.

Running: A Family Affair
By Laurie Ann March

after the race

family & friends

When I made the decision that I was going to train and run my first 5K race I expected that I’d be doing this on my own. My husband Bryan and I bought a treadmill in late 2011 so I could work towards becoming a runner. What happened surprised me. Bryan, who for years insisted that runners never smile and running fun did not belong in the same conversation, announced that he would run the race as well. I almost fell off the treadmill in shock. What happened to “over my dead body” or “when hell freezes over”? Our eleven year old son, Tobias, voiced that he wanted to run the race too and the next thing I knew we were a family of runners. The whole family was outfitted with good quality footwear and training began. As the weather improved we purchased a running stroller for Kaia, our eighteen month old little girl, and started running outside.

You are probably wondering about the stroller—it has been a wonderful thing and Kaia loves to ride in it. The key, as we quickly learned, is to make sure she had a few toys, a snack, and something to drink. Making sure she is comfortably dressed for the conditions is important too. It is adorable to hear her cheering Bryan on. “Faster Daddy! Faster!” she often exclaims. After a run we take a detour to the park. This allows us some time to stretch while she has fun on the playground. One can’t put on running clothes in our house without her getting excited and she gets a little bit upset if one of us is merely going for a jaunt on the treadmill. Well, downright grumpy might be more accurate. If the weather is inclement we run at the indoor track and she loves that too. Bryan usually finishes a bit before I do so he releases Kaia from the stroller. She’s older now and runs just over one kilometre around the track. She loves it. She will be turning four in June so the stroller will be retired soon. When that time comes Bryan and I will have to take turns going on our runs or consider hiring a sitter. Of course, we’ll still take her out on her own little adventures.

There are many benefits to being a running family. It keeps us fit. It gets the kids outside and reduces their screen time. It creates an environment of support which spills over into other aspects of our lives. Running as a family is a wonderful way to combine training with spending time together. Bryan, Tobias, and I run at different paces so we usually do our warm-up together and then go off on our separate runs, then meeting at the end. Tobias will run with me from time-to-time but if there is a race coming up and he needs to push his limits he goes with his Dad. Bryan travels extensively with his career so it is a perfect time for them to have those guy to guy chats.

my little runner

my little runner

Last spring I trained for my first half marathon, Tobias wasn’t able to run as far as I was going so I set out on my own one Saturday morning. About 15K into my run I heard a familiar voice shout “Hi Mom” and there he was on his bicycle. He told me that he was amazed at how far I ran and that it took him awhile to catch up. Next thing I knew Bryan, who was recovering from a nasty chest cold, was there on his bike with Kaia in tow. This gave me just that little spark I needed to keep going. One summer day Bryan watched Kaia while Tobias and I hit the trails near our home. We decided to go without a pre-set plan and be spontaneously adventurous. There are some beautiful side trails that weave in and out along the Grand River so we would just turn at a whim and see where we end up. At one point we were forced to turn around because the brambles were so thick that it was becoming extremely difficult not to mention a little hard on the legs. We do this from time to time and those runs really bring out my inner child.

A favourite memory is from my first 10K event—a very hilly trail run that took place one night in October. I am diabetic and I had a serious blood sugar crash around the 5K mark. I almost walked off the course because I had taken too much time to deal with that and wasn’t feeling well at all. Emotionally this run was taking its toll. The water stations had been taken down and the paramedic was sweeping the course behind me but I was determined to finish even if I was dead last. Just then, Tobias ran up to me and said that we were going to cross the finish line together. He had received permission to get back on the course to run with me and had a medal around his neck. I knew there were no finishing medals for this race and he told me he won first place for his age group. I was so proud of him for doing his best and I would have been even if he hadn’t been given an award. He told me that he was proud of me too. I fought back the tears because I was extremely moved that he came out to run with me. It made my night and turned what was a rough experience for me into one I will always cherish. It was in that moment I realized how running has brought us closer as a family.

What we have discovered is that introducing the kids to running was much easier than I could have imagined. By making it a part of our lifestyle and keeping it fun, our children seem to have embraced running and it has truly become a family affair. So, whether you are a seasoned runner about to enter into parenthood or you are a new runner trying to figure out how to balance training with a busy family life, perhaps you can find some inspiration from our little running family.

Do you run as a family? How do you get your kids and partner to share in your love of running?

Connect with the Toronto Yonge Street 10K Digital Champions team here!

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The new year is well under way and everyone in our family is back to the typical routines; school, work, and play. This morning the house was unusually quiet giving me the perfect opportunity to share my plans for 2014 with you.

It is always tempting with the promise and energy that comes with ringing in a new year to make the typical resolutions but I’ve learned over the years that being goal-oriented throughout the year works so much better for me. My plans are not entirely unlike what they have been in past years and I’ve already alluded to some of them over the last month.

"gotcha, Mom"

“gotcha, Mom”

Tobias will be 13 this year. Egads! I will be Mom to a teenager. It’s so hard for me to believe that the little guy in this photo has grown so quickly. It seems like yesterday that he was drenching me with that water gun. Kaia will turn 4 and she’ll be starting school in the Fall. That went fast too!  I enjoy motherhood immensely and I love passing on wisdom and life skills to my darlings. I am always learning new things from my children too. I believe that being able to learn from the those around me also makes me a good teacher. We’ll be participating in loads of outside stuff with the kids including the usual running, hiking, cycling, and camping.

I’m working towards running the Mississauga Marathon. I am running the half distance in that race as well and my intention is to knock a great deal off last year’s pace (21 minutes to be exact). Then, three weeks later, I will run the 25K at the arduous Sulphur Springs event. 25K will be a new personal distance record for me and my goal is simply to finish with a smile. Of course, there is also the race ambassador role that I have taken on—Digital Champion with CRS for the Toronto Yonge Street 10K. I’m having lots of fun with that and can’t wait until race day on April 13th, 2014. It is wonderful to be involved with such a great group of runners and the support from the other Digital Champions has been incredible.

I’ve started boxing and kick-boxing inspired workouts for cross-training and Bryan suggested that I could use a heavy bag as part of my workouts. I don’t want to be in the basement as the space is uninspiring, to say the least, so he suggested setting up a little training area in our backyard once things dry up in the late Spring. This way Kaia could play in the fresh air while I pound it out. I did a bit of yoga out there last summer and it was wonderful. We’ve also been talking about ropes and tires and other things that could be used outside to add some intensity to our training.

Living a healthy lifestyle which includes being active and eating a whole foods based diet will continue to be a big part of our lives. Being as healthy as we can is important to Bryan and I. We also strive to continue being positive role models for our children. This isn’t just about physical health but about the mind and the spirit too.  We make an effort to unplug the whole family from electronics and spend time together without that sort of distraction. 2014 will be no different in that regard. Speaking of which, we will be camping again this year. Last year we invested in bike-packing equipment and camped along Le P’tit Train du Nord in Quebec. The trip was a bit of an adventure but we learned so much from it and will return that region to explore some more. It will be interesting this year because Kaia will be on a Trail-A-Bike rather than in a child trailer. With that in mind, we will plan shorter days. We are also going to be camping and cycling with our dear friends Sandi and Phil as well as their son Tyrel. Funny I’ve known Sandi for decades and we have lived together but never camped together. We even have a spooky Halloween camping adventure planned.

I will be taking that climbing lesson and belay certification that I had planned for my last birthday. Sadly I had to cancel it because I broke my toes a few weeks before the date. I was much more disappointed than I expected to be. I’m considering a few other activities that I swore I’d never do, including zip lining. Did I mention that I am utterly terrified of gravity? Time to get over that!

From a business perspective, I finally closed GJ Studios and started a new company called Outdoor Adventure Press. The new identity suits the direction I am headed in career wise. I’m currently finishing up the manuscript for my third camping related cookbook after having to extend the project when my Mom passed away. It should hit shelves in early 2015 and I will be happy to share it with the world. The other two books continue to be fairly popular titles in their genre. I’m also launching a new outdoorsy related project that has an emphasis on children and families. This has been in the works for some time but writing the book took more time than anticipated. I will continue my freelance writing for outdoor publications and there will also be a few running related articles as the year progresses.

I’m curious to see what else this year has in store for my family and me. I love the fact that a new year is like a blank book just waiting for the pages to fill and the story to unfold.

Hello 2014!

So, tell me, what are your plans for this year?

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